Quinoa Pasta with Broccoli, Snow Peas, and Chorizo Sausage

Quinoa Pasta with Broccoli, Snow Peas, and Chorizo Sausage 2

Why don’t we address the giant elephant in the room: I’ve been AWOL for over a year, and I apologize for that, I really do.  However, I’m returning with cool cooking experiences under my belt and some even better ones about to start (including a foray into a two Michelin-starred kitchen!).  Now here’s a picture of a cute baby elephant.  Please don’t go to the circus.

Baby-Elephant-HD-Photos

Source: hdwallpaperstop.com

Today I’m presenting you a pasta with a twist if you will, the base of which is a gluten-free quinoa pasta.  I purchased quinoa elbows from the Whole Foods in Venice, CA, where customers can buy as much or as little of the pasta as they want.  If you do indeed want to make this dish with quinoa pasta, I suggest using the Ancient Harvest brand.  The main difference I’ve noticed between quinoa pasta and “regular” pasta is that there is, as you might guess, no starch or gluten to provide a thick consistency and hearty bite.  With that said, I enjoyed the lightness of these elbows and wouldn’t mind cooking with them again.  Quinoa in general is a great source of calcium, phosphorous, and iron.

To provide a salty and flavor-packed component, I bought one pork chorizo sausage link, which came out to about 3 ounces.  You might opt for other sausage varieties: spicy chicken, lamb merguez, or something without a kick if you’re so inclined.  If you can’t find snow peas, you can easily omit them, or substitute another crunchy vegetable. Lastly, while I tried to keep this dish at one serving size, I found that it was almost impossible given the quantity of broccoli and sausage. So, I hope you won’t mind having leftovers for the next day or later in the week!
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Lentil Salad with Arugula and Feta (And a Warm Honey Vinaigrette to Make Your Heart Melt)

Just a few things I’d like to say to you.  Firstly, thank you so much for actually trying these recipes.  While I try to take myself seriously as much as possible, I’m always surprised when other people do, so thank you.

Secondly, as you may have surmised sometimes it’s hard for me to know if these recipes are worth your time, because the only palate I have to rely on is my own.  And while I am constantly aiming for improvements in said palate, it’s always comforting when there are others to confirm the deliciousness (or lack thereof) of the food I make.  So when I made this salad for my family, I was doing secret self-high fives when it turned into an “ooh” “yum” “I can’t stop sticking my fork straight in the plate” kind of moment.  I’m especially flattered when these moments come from my sister, whose opinion I value immensely. My dad made roast chicken, and I served this up along with some grilled fennel.

A few notes on the salad. If you’re wondering why I ask you to chop the arugula, it’s because I’d rather the lettuce be reduced to more manageable pieces which will fit onto a fork nicely with the lentils.

The dressing: it’s a big deal for me.  I’ve recently come to the conclusion that warm dressings are to salads what iPhones are to adults: in no way necessary but a whole lot of fun. Please play around with all of the ingredient quantities – I know what I like, but perhaps you like things a touch sweeter or a tad more acidic.  Change accordingly. It might taste bad at one point (mine did) but keep playing around and I guarantee it will turn into something outrageous.

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Summer Whole Wheat Pasta with Corn, Tomatoes, & Tuna

Good Thursday morning to everybody!

I confess that I didn’t intend to write this much at the outset, but once I got started I realized that I have so much to say to you today, mainly about one ingredient in particular.  I think this delicious pasta got me excited and I have rambled, and I apologize.  Please feel free to skip straight down to the recipe, or continue reading for what I consider to be interesting information on what comprises about 0.4% of our body’s weight.

So before I let you go on your merry way and continue your beautiful life, I am going to impart some information to you.  As I’ve mentioned before, since January I’ve been working as a cook and teaching assistant at Haven’s Kitchen, a beautiful cooking school and private event space in NYC.  Working here initially was not only exciting to me (I felt like I finally got the job I always wanted!) but so scary that I felt like a person with no hands constantly trying to grip a knife – I was trying to find ways to work efficiently, but I had no idea how to do so.

As an avid home cook for over 6 years, I have enjoyed testing out recipes, playing around with my food, and cooking for friends and family at my leisure.  Stepping into Haven’s Kitchen represented the first time I was working side by side with some of the best chefs I know (ok, fine, all of the best chefs I know), who harked from such amazing restaurants as Per Se, WD-50, and Le Bernardin.  Restaurant chefs operate on a different level and get a different kind of high than home cooks do from spending time in the kitchen, and lets just say we didn’t speak the same language.

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Zucchini Stuffed with Wild Rice, Cheddar, and Dill

Here’s another one for that tried and true 5-ingredients-or-less category.

In my opinion, the clinchers here are threefold: the zucchini flesh is scooped out and added to the stuffing; the cheddar I used was sharp, tangy, and heavenly (and from Ithaca!); and the zucchini base is cooked in a skillet before going in the oven, which adds immensely to its flavor.

If you’re of a generally hungry disposition, eating both stuffed zucchini halves will be an optimal choice.  Others of you may find that eating only one half will suffice.  I have the pleasure of telling you that when you’re in the confines of your own home, cooking for yourself, you can pretty much do and eat whatever you would like.  If you’re of the latter category, this dish stores well in the fridge and can be reheated for lunch or dinner the following day.

A note on rice: how do you usually cook it?  Everyone has their method, and this is the one my mother taught me: soak the rice ten minutes, then rinse.  Add enough water to the pot of rice so that when you stick your index finger into the pot to touch the top of the rice, the water will reach the first crease in your index finger.  This method has yet to fail me (if I find that halfway through cooking rice there is too much water, I remove the lid to let some water evaporate). If you find this idea too unstable or risky, then I suggest following the cooking instructions on the package the rice came in.

To my wonderful internet friends, I wish you a beautiful weekend.  Here is a nice quote and photo I saw from Rumi the other day:

“Lovely days don’t come to you, you should walk to them”.

 

Zucchini Stuffed with Wild Rice- serves 1

  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 1 tablespoon olive oil/veg oil, plus more for brushing
  • 1 medium zucchini
  • 1-2 tablespoons chopped fresh dill (depending on how dill-y you like things)
  • 1/3-cup grated sharp cheddar
  • 1 lemon (optional)

1. Soak rice 10 minutes in water. Rinse, then cover with enough water to reach the first crease of your finger when touching top of the rice.
2. Add a pinch of salt and the tablespoon olive oil to pot. Bring to boil, cover, and simmer until done, about 35-40 minutes.
3. Preheat broiler. Meanwhile, cut zucchini in half lengthwise. Scoop out flesh and seeds to create a stuffable base and save flesh and seeds. Brush zucchini halves all over with olive oil, and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
4. Heat a skillet over medium-high heat. Add zucchini halves and cook until lightly browned on both sides, about 2 minutes per side.
5. Roughly chop zucchini flesh, and add to rice mixture along with fresh dill and half of grated cheddar. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Stuff both zucchini halves with rice mixture, and top with remaining grated cheese. Broil until cheese is bubbly, about 5 minutes. Serve immediately with lemon juice, if desired.

Lemon Chicken with Asparagus and Avocado

I’ve been missing in action recently, a situation which has presented itself before since this blog’s inception in August of 2009.  This time my absence is due to my new-ish job at Haven’s Kitchen, where I work as a teaching assistant and sometimes as a prep cook for catered events there.

It’s been hectic mainly because I’ve been busy learning how to act as a professional cook and not as a home cook.  The differences between these two types of cooking are numerous, and I’d like to share with you the top 5 most important things I’ve learned about working in an industrial kitchen, and how it differs from cooking at home.

1. Salt your food.  I mean, really salt your food.

  • More salt goes into one dish in a night than I’m used to using in the span of a week- to give you an idea of what I mean,  take the amount of salt you think is appropriate for a dish, triple it, add a few more pinches, and then you’re just shy of the right amount. I suggest you not eat out anymore if this fact scares you.

2. Time is of utmost importance.

  • In my mind, this is the essential difference between a home cook and a professional: at home, you don’t want to spend hours making dinner, but you could if you wanted to.  At work, taking a long time to complete a task is a sign of inefficiency and inability to work properly.  I’m still getting used to this one.

3. Season as you go. Taste everything, every step of the way.

  • I hear almost every teacher say it during classes, and I see chefs doing it during service time for events – every dish should be tasted and seasoned from the very beginning to right before being plated.  This might seem strange to those who cook at home, but it ultimately makes sense:  in order to control the final result, you need to monitor the dish’s taste along the way.  Salt, salt, salt!

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Shrimp Fried Quinoa

Senior year of college I lived with ten other girls in an 11-bedroom house.  Suffice it to say that we were a group of “strong-minded” Cornell women, infringing upon other roommates’ personal space and sanity with less than stellar cleaning habits and oftentimes downright rude clothing theft (which we considered silent “borrowing” at the time).

The other day over drinks a few of us were laughing about the fact that almost all of us now live alone, in very clean spaces.

Clearly that experience left a lasting mark on all of us, so this post is dedicated to my fellow Cornell alum/solo-dwelling/sanity-seeking former roommates, whom I will always admire for going through all that we did.

Now let’s get to the food: this is a seriously good meal which you may consider strange to make for one person.  I can’t decide whether I agree with you, but regardless you can easily double this recipe and enjoy it with a significant other, good friend, roommate, etc.

If you’re wondering, the answer is yes: you can most definitely substitute another cooked grain for quinoa, with certain ones immediately coming to mind such as faro, brown rice, wild rice, spelt, millet, or couscous.  Cook each and every one according to package instructions and you’ll be golden.  On Friday I discovered a fantastic and fool-proof way to cook quinoa, in which you cook it like pasta and drain it once fully cooked – no need to worry about adding the perfect amount of water.  Amazing, I know.

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Blackened Salmon with Feta-Yogurt Sauce and Golden Couscous

This recipe was particularly fun to make, and especially fun to photograph.  For some reason I ended up putting it on my floor, taking a photo of it there, and then sitting in the same spot and eating the whole dish.  There is a small window of time, usually around 2pm, when sun manages to find a small crevice between all of the tall New York City buildings and floods into my second floor apartment, and therefore onto me.  I love sitting and eating under the sunshine during this brief moment, which is what I was able to do today.

The truth is that I just got back from a relaxing and much-appreciated vacation with my mom and sister in Barbados, and I’ve got fish on my mind in a major way.  Almost every meal we ate there featured grilled fish – usually mahi mahi, snapper, or dorado – lightly seasoned and served with plenty of Scotch bonnet hot sauce (my new favorite hot and slightly sweet sauce, in case you’re wondering).  For this reason the only recipe ideas that were swimming in my mind were fish, spicy, and sweet.  Thus was born this recipe which I am delighted to share with you!

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Fennel and Cod in Soy Lime Sauce

Only five ingredients in this beauty!

Like I said, this recipe only uses five ingredients (not counting salt and pepper).  So if you’re thinking that this is a fancy, experience-required recipe, you can guess again!

Before we get to the recipe I would like to show you how I cut my fennel, in case there are some of you at home (or at work now) who are not familiar with cutting this flavorful, licorice-tinged vegetable.  Some of my friends are interested in cooking (here’s looking at you, Olivia!) and have become quite good at it.  Other good friends of mine are either too busy, don’t see the point, or are intimidated by getting started in the kitchen.  I used to fall into the latter category.

But I think you have to ask yourself, what’s the worst that could happen?  You will fail miserably – that is almost inevitable in your early cooking career.  But you will also pick yourself up and try it again, and once you get the hang of it you’ll find that you’re not only good at it, but that it’s also more rewarding than you ever imagined.

Anyways, to properly cut fennel, first start with a full stalk, which you can buy at most grocery stores.  Smell the fennel – perhaps it will remind you of those black licorice-flavored Twizzlers you never liked?  Don’t worry, that flavor is very mild once mixed with the soy sauce, lime, and honey.

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In Defense of Cooking for One (Plus 6 tips for doing it cheaply)

Perhaps you feel the same way I do when you look at anything with the term “for one” – you immediately tag it as depressing.  I feel this way often, and it is still a big concern of mine with the title and purpose this blog.  The thought of shopping for yourself, coming home and preparing food alone, just to sit down with….yourself for dinner is far from enticing or appealing.

I would like to say that I feel lonely or sad when I eat alone, but I always derive pleasure out of it, and the fact is a lot of people find themselves eating for one at some point or another, for a number of reasons.  I live alone in New York City, and four of my closest friends do too.  A lot of other friends and acquaintances live with roommates, and find themselves needing to fly solo at last two or three days a week.  I have gotten quite a few emails as well from widows, married people who travel often, and bachelors with roommates who want to make healthy and simple meals.   And for any single cooks out there, you can use your newly acquired cooking skills to invite over another adorable person and seduce him/her with your amazing culinary skills!

So I write these posts not from a need to deprecate myself and throw every one into a state of depression at the thought of eating solo, but to remind you that making food for yourself is a fantastic indulgence and that it is also quite rewarding once you get the hang of it.  True, you don’t get the pleasure and satisfaction of making a meal for someone else (which is something I love to do), but there are some major advantages to cooking for yourself.  You can eat whatever you want, and even if it’s weird, strange-looking, or just plain gross, no one is there to judge you.  So dig in!

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Breaded Sage Chicken with Easy Roast Vegetables

I got the idea to make this recipe from my sister Yasmin who isn’t a big fan of using breadcrumbs.  Fortunately for me, she bought a great quality bag from Eataly to use for her chicken parmigiana recipe, and she happily gave me what was leftover (which was most of the bag).  I think breadcrumbs are a fantastic thing to have on hand for anyone looking to pull a quick and easy meal together.

Breadcrumbs add loads of flavor to anything they coat, and they are delightfully simple to work with.  Just toss whatever you’re eating – porckhops, chicken thighs, fish fillets – with a little bit of egg or oil, sprinkle with salt and pepper, coat with breadcrumbs and cook in an oiled skillet until done.  Breadcrumbs go particularly well with lemon juice.  For another suggestion on how to use them check out my recipe for breaded hake with peppery lemons.

This recipe was an automatic winner for me also because it includes one of my favorite foods to cook in the winter,  the sweet potato.  Can I just say, my sweet potato only cost .69 cents from the expensive “gourmet” grocery store down the street, which kind of makes me feel like I’m cheating someone when I eat it.  Inexpensive, packed with flavor, AND really good for you?  Impossible!

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