Summer Egg Tortilla with Zucchini, Almonds, and Prosciutto

Here is a recipe I made for lunch the other day, highlighting one of my favorite summer ingredients: zucchini, a type of summer squash.  Its soft, dark green exterior gives way to a meaty and flavorful interior that tastes delicious as is with just a splash of lemon juice and a bit of salt, but which also tastes great in a number of salads, soups, sautes, and roasts.

I decided here to saute it quickly and combine it in an egg tortilla of sorts (think more of an egg wrap) with toasted and sliced almonds, feta, and prosciutto.  I chose not to use the Italian-style prosciutto from where the ingredient’s name finds origin, opting instead for a Spanish style prosciutto, or “jamon Serrano,” whose thin and flavorful slices provide a melt-in-your-mouth texture and a delightfully salty ham taste.

The egg wrap itself has fresh chopped herbs mixed in so every bite packs a punch.  I made this for a lighter lunch but you can instantly make this dish more substantial by wrapping all ingredients up in a soft, pillowy tortilla.

You will have leftover zucchini, which I recommend tossing with lemon juice, olive oil, salt, and pepper and serving as a side salad with your egg wrap.  Enjoy!

Summer Egg Tortilla with Zucchini, Almond, Feta, and Prosciutto – serves 1

  • 2 eggs (large organic preferably – from local farmer even better!)
  • 2 tablespoons chopped herbs, such as chives, parsley, cilantro, or mint
  • 1 small handful sliced almonds
  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 1 small zucchini, halved lengthwise, then thinly sliced crosswise
  • 2 slices prosciutto, shredded with your hands into bite-size pieces
  • 2-3 tablespoons feta cheese

1. In a shallow bowl, whisk eggs vigorously until well combined. Add herbs, and a pinch of salt and pepper. Whisk to combine.
2. Heat a small skillet on medium heat. Add almond slices and toast until browned and fragrant, about 2 minutes. Remove almonds from skillet and set aside.
3. Return skillet to medium heat and add half of butter, cooking until it starts to bubble. Add half of zucchini and a pinch of salt. Cook until zucchini is golden, stirring frequently, about 4-5 minutes. Remove zucchini from skillet.
4. Add rest of butter. Once butter is melted and just starting to bubble add eggs, and don’t stir. Tilt pan occasionally and slide eggs toward center of pan to let uncooked egg slide to bottom of skillet. Once bottom side of eggs has set, use an inverted plate to flip it over (place plate over skillet – flip eggs onto plate, slide eggs back into skillet so uncooked side is facing down). Cook about 30 seconds longer, or until eggs have just set.
5. Slide eggs onto plate. Top with prosciutto, feta, zucchini, and almonds. Roll and hold in place with toothpicks. Enjoy!

Shrimp Fried Quinoa

Senior year of college I lived with ten other girls in an 11-bedroom house.  Suffice it to say that we were a group of “strong-minded” Cornell women, infringing upon other roommates’ personal space and sanity with less than stellar cleaning habits and oftentimes downright rude clothing theft (which we considered silent “borrowing” at the time).

The other day over drinks a few of us were laughing about the fact that almost all of us now live alone, in very clean spaces.

Clearly that experience left a lasting mark on all of us, so this post is dedicated to my fellow Cornell alum/solo-dwelling/sanity-seeking former roommates, whom I will always admire for going through all that we did.

Now let’s get to the food: this is a seriously good meal which you may consider strange to make for one person.  I can’t decide whether I agree with you, but regardless you can easily double this recipe and enjoy it with a significant other, good friend, roommate, etc.

If you’re wondering, the answer is yes: you can most definitely substitute another cooked grain for quinoa, with certain ones immediately coming to mind such as faro, brown rice, wild rice, spelt, millet, or couscous.  Cook each and every one according to package instructions and you’ll be golden.  On Friday I discovered a fantastic and fool-proof way to cook quinoa, in which you cook it like pasta and drain it once fully cooked – no need to worry about adding the perfect amount of water.  Amazing, I know.

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